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The Missouri Department of Conservation
operates this 80-acre portion of Ozarks habitat,
featuring three miles of well-maintained gravel,
wood-chipped, boardwalk and paved trails for
walking and running. Over 170 species of birds,
deer, turkey, muskrat, chipmunks, frogs and in-
sects reside in these scenic woods and glades.
Wildflowers flourish along the bottomland
prairie. To come across a doe grazing with her
fawn is common. From the nature center's photo
blind, Bald Eagles and Red-tail Hawks can be
spotted in winter.
Inside the Nature Center building, there are
numerous educational displays, fish tanks,
reptiles, art and wildlife photography exhibits, a
bird observation nook, auditorium and class-
rooms for events.
Springfield Conservation
Nature Center
4600 S. Chrisman
Springfield MO
417 888-4237
http://www.mdc.mo.gov/
areas/cnc/springfd
Open:
8am-9pm March-Oct.
8am-6pm Nov.-Feb.
Building hours 8am-5pm
Admission:
free
no pets
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Nearby Springfield Lake, James River Water
Trail and Galloway Creek Greenway add more
beautiful features to visit in this area.
Questions:
1. What is your favorite wild animal, and why?
Is this animal native to this region?
2. What might happen if an animal's habitat is
removed or destroyed?
3. If all the insects in the world disappeared,
what would happen to the plants?
4. Why don't Conservation Agents want people
feeding fish in the creek and the lake?
Directions:
From the corner of
Glenstone Avenue and
Battlefield Road, drive
south on Glenstone past
the James River Freeway.
Turn left at the Springfield
Nature Center sign and
follow the road less than a
mile. A large sign on the
right hand side will direct
you to the spacious
parking lot.
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